The OrthoApnea Scientific Committee team

The OrthoApnea Scientific Committee team

Meet the team that forms the OrthoApnea Scientific Committee. The OrthoApnea Scientific Committee is defined by a group of multidisciplinary specialists in Oral Sleep Medicine whose objective is to strengthen the excellence of the OrthoApnea device as treatment for snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Here we introduce you to the members of our team of specialists: Dr. Javier Vila, a otolaryngologist at the Vall d’Hebron Hospital in Barcelona and dentist, is Director of the Scientific Committee and reinforces the presence…

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The effectiveness of mandibular advancement devices in reducing blood pressure.

The effectiveness of mandibular advancement devices in reducing blood pressure.

The effectiveness of mandibular advancement devices in reducing blood pressure. On this occasion, Dr. Pedro Mayoral makes a brief comment about the study of Sekizuka, H., Osada, N., and Akashi, YJ (2016) on the effectiveness of AMD in the treatment of snoring and OSAS, and their relationship with blood pressure.   A recently published article has demonstrated the effectiveness of mandibular advancement devices such as Orthoapnea in the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea and its effectiveness in reducing blood pressure….

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Experiences with anti snoring devices

Experiences with anti snoring devices

Experiences with Anti Snoring and Mandibular Advancement devices. Many of us snore and for most it is no problem. However for some snoring is a cause of poor sleep and possibly encourages/contributes to sleep apnea (breathing difficulty during sleep). It can also be a cause of tension within relationships. At Northway Dental Practice is offered one of the most effective treatments for snoring: the Mandibular Advancement Device (also called an anti-snoring appliance or snoring appliance). This works by positioning the lower jaw a…

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The prevalence of OSAS

The prevalence of OSAS

The prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea. In today’s post we reflect the results of a study on the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) conducted by the University of Wisconsin, EEUU. In this study, 1,520 participants (96% of them non-hispanic whites) were enrolled, and a total of 4,563 sleep studies were performed for the diagnosis of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) between 1988 and 2011, pictured in the following table: The table shows that 32.7 % of the population presented suffered…

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Mild obstructive sleep apnoea: MAD as the most appropriate long-term treatment

Mild obstructive sleep apnoea: MAD as the most appropriate long-term treatment

In an article published by Lancet journal in May 2016, Walter T McNicholas and his colleagues demonstrate the effectiveness of mandibular advancement devices (DAM), such as OrthoApnea, in the treatment of mild, moderate and even severe sleep apnoea. In the aforesaid article, they indicate that oral appliance therapy might be more suitable as long-term therapy because of better compliance to treatment. Mandibular Advancement Device (MAD) treatment is more suitable as long-term therapy because of its effectiveness and better compliance to treatment. Oral appliance therapy is…

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Daylight Saving Time: how does it affect us and how to ease its effects

Daylight Saving Time: how does it affect us and how to ease its effects

Winter is coming and to bring the ending of Daylight Saving time: the moment when we have to set our clocks one hour back to adjust it to standard time. And although it’s only 1 hour time difference, this change can cause variations in our health that not only affect our sleep but also our mood, physical and intellectual performance or even eating habits, among others. Our body can take up to several days to get used to the new…

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Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea: MAD as an alternative to CPAP

Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea: MAD as an alternative to CPAP

In clinical settings, many patients experience more severe OSA while asleep in the supine position than in the lateral position. 9,10 Individuals are defined as positional OSA (P-OSA) if their overall apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) is higher than 5 events/h, and the ratio of their lateral AHI to supine AHI is 0.5 or less. A substantial number of studies demonstrated that P-OSA is present in 50% to 60% of patients who undergo polysomnography. Furthermore, a few reports suggested that P-OSA patients responded better to MAD than patients with non-positional OSA…

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5 types of nap and its benefits

5 types of nap and its benefits

Whilst more than 85% of mammals are polyphasic (they sleep throughout the day in various short periods), we, human beings, are monophasic sleepers, i.e. our day is divided into two parts: in the first one we sleep and in another one we remain fully awake. That is the theory.  In practice, there is a word called “nap”.  Does it sound familiar to you? A habit that puts on doubt all this theory of monophasic sleep. Do you know where this…

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Traveling with sleep apnea is possible

Traveling with sleep apnea is possible

Sleep apnea causes that millions of people have sleeping problems and are unable to get a restorative sleep, feeling exhausted every morning. CPAP is the most common treatment for nighttime apneas and allows the patient a good rest. The people who depend on this machine have to use it continuously throughout the night and surely during all their life. Being dependent on a machine every night makes many people resort to the mandibular advancement devices (MAD) as Orthoapnea.  The most…

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Risks of the CPAP – What alternative treatments are there?

Risks of the CPAP – What alternative treatments are there?

CPAP is the most common treatment chosen by people who have been diagnosed with sleep apnea. It is a continuous positive pressure machine the patient should wear at night.  The device, which includes a mask with tubes and a fan, uses air pressure to keep the throat open during sleep and to make breathing easier, reducing snoring and apneas. The CPAP is, however, not a curative treatment. Its success depends largely on a highly demanding rigorous attachment to the device,…

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